John Coltrane Giant Steps

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (1960/2014) [Official Digital Download 24/192]

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (1960/2014) [MONO]
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 37:35 minutes | 691 MB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Coltrane's groundbreaking Atlantic Records debut. This 1959 release became Trane's most influential album and helped bring jazz to the mainstream. Forty years after its release, it still remains one of the all-time great jazz albums. Features such jazz greats as Paul Chambers, Wynton Kelly, Tommy Flanagan, Jimmy Cobb and Art Taylor.
John Coltrane - Giant Steps (1960) [Japanese SHM-SACD '2011] PS3 ISO + Hi-Res FLAC {RE-UP}

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (1960) [Japanese SHM-SACD '2011] - MONO
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 37:34 minutes | Scans included | 1,17 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 741 MB

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (MFSL) (1959)  Music

Posted by uff at Jan. 17, 2010
John Coltrane - Giant Steps (MFSL) (1959)

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (MFSL) (1959)
jazz | 1CD | EAC Rip | WV+CUE+LOG | cover | 490MB
MFSL UDCD 605 | 12 tracks | RAR +5% recovery

AMG
History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience. Although this was John Coltrane's debut for Atlantic, he was concurrently performing and recording with Miles Davis. Within the space of less than three weeks, Coltrane would complete his work with Davis and company on another genre-defining disc, Kind of Blue, before commencing his efforts on this one. Coltrane (tenor sax) is flanked by essentially two different trios. Recording commenced in early May of 1959 with a pair of sessions that featured Tommy Flanagan (piano) and Art Taylor (drums), as well as Paul Chambers – who was the only band member other than Coltrane to have performed on every date. When recording resumed in December of that year, Wynton Kelly (piano) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) were instated – replicating the lineup featured on Kind of Blue, sans Miles Davis of course. At the heart of these recordings, however, is the laser-beam focus of Coltrane's tenor solos. All seven pieces issued on the original Giant Steps are likewise Coltrane compositions.
John Coltrane - Giant Steps (24bit rem japanese mini LP) (1959)

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (24bit rem japanese mini LP) (1959)
jazz | 1CD | EAC Rip | FLAC+CUE+LOG | cover | 530MB
Warner | 24bit miniLP 2006 | 15 tracks | RAR +5% recovery

AMG
History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience. Although this was John Coltrane's debut for Atlantic, he was concurrently performing and recording with Miles Davis. Within the space of less than three weeks, Coltrane would complete his work with Davis and company on another genre-defining disc, Kind of Blue, before commencing his efforts on this one. Coltrane (tenor sax) is flanked by essentially two different trios. Recording commenced in early May of 1959 with a pair of sessions that featured Tommy Flanagan (piano) and Art Taylor (drums), as well as Paul Chambers – who was the only band member other than Coltrane to have performed on every date. When recording resumed in December of that year, Wynton Kelly (piano) and Jimmy Cobb (drums) were instated – replicating the lineup featured on Kind of Blue, sans Miles Davis of course. At the heart of these recordings, however, is the laser-beam focus of Coltrane's tenor solos. All seven pieces issued on the original Giant Steps are likewise Coltrane compositions.

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (Repost)  Music

Posted by coster1906 at Nov. 13, 2008
John Coltrane - Giant Steps (Repost)

John Coltrane - Giant Steps (1960)
Jazz | Rhino Records | MP3 @ 320KBits (CBR) | 142MB | 63:00

John Coltrane's maiden voyage for Atlantic Records was the fulfillment of all the potential he'd demonstrated with Miles, Monk and on his own Prestige recordings. Recorded in May 1959 (one month after completing Davis' KIND OF BLUE), GIANT STEPS is Coltrane's first recital to feature nothing but his own original compositions, and is the culmination of his obsessive foray into harmony.
John Coltrane - The Atlantic Studio Album Collection (2015) [Official Digital Download]

John Coltrane - The Atlantic Studio Album Collection (2015)
8 Albums | FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz | Time - 306:49 minutes | ~ 11,7 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover(s)

During Coltrane’s Atlantic years, he made important recordings such as Giant Steps and My Favorite Things, recorded albums with Milt Jackson, Don Cherry, and Eric Dolphy and made his debut on the soprano saxophone…
John Coltrane - 8 Atlantic Album Collection (1959-61) [8CD] {2006 Japan Mini LP 24-bit Remaster} [combined repost]

John Coltrane - 8 Atlantic Album Collection (1959-62) [8CD] {2006 Japan Mini LP 24-bit Remaster}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC+CUE+LOG -> 3.19 Gb | MP3 @320 -> 1.12 Gb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (jpg) -> 118 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24-bit remaster
© 2006 Atlantic / Warner Music Japan | WPCR-25101~08
Jazz / Hard Bop / Post Bop / Avant-Garde Jazz / Saxophone

History will undoubtedly enshrine this disc as a watershed the likes of which may never truly be appreciated. Giant Steps bore the double-edged sword of furthering the cause of the music as well as delivering it to an increasingly mainstream audience. Although this was John Coltrane's debut for Atlantic, he was concurrently performing and recording with Miles Davis. Within the space of less than three weeks, Coltrane would complete his work with Davis and company on another genre-defining disc, Kind of Blue, before commencing his efforts on this one. Coltrane (tenor sax) is flanked by essentially two different trios.
John Coltrane - Selflessness: Featuring My Favorite Things (1969/2017) [Official Digital Download 24-bit/192kHz]

John Coltrane - Selflessness: Featuring My Favorite Things (1969/2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 40:42 minutes | 1,89 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

"Selflessness: featuring My Favorite Things" is a posthumous album by jazz musician John Coltrane, released in 1969 via Impulse! label. The album opens with a staggering 17 minute rendition of "My Favourite Things" recorded live at the Newport Jazz Festival in 1963…
John Coltrane - Live In Seattle (1965/2017) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

John Coltrane - Live In Seattle (1965/2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 76:31 minutes | 1,73 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

John Coltrane arrived in Seattle on September 30, 1965 with his classic quartet pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison, and drummer Elvin Jones plus a couple of friends he'd run into in San Francisco a few days earlier. Seemingly on sudden impulse, Coltrane added to the band free-honking tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders and multi-instrumentalist devotee of Eastern religions Donald Rafael Garrett. They were there to play a gig at the Penthouse, a jazz club at the corner of First and Cherry. The album that resulted, Live in Seattle, is such a relentlessly raw and abrasive document of late-period Coltrane that it can be a challenge to listen to the whole thing.
John Coltrane - Stellar Regions (1967/1995/2017) [Official Digital Download 24/192]

John Coltrane - Stellar Regions (1967/1995/2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 45:16 minutes | 1,91 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

This set is drawn from a February 15, 1967, recording session one of John Coltrane's last days in the studio. The tapes had been in Alice Coltrane's care since the recording, and she gave titles to the pieces, overseeing their release on CD in 1995. All are previously unreleased with the exception of "Offering" which appeared on Expression. As on that release, there's evidence here that Coltrane's relentless musical search was drawing him ever further out. The performances are shorter, focused, with a magisterial lyricism seamlessly integrated with exclamatory shrieks and cries.